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What was the strongest landfalling hurricane? - Printable Version

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What was the strongest landfalling hurricane? - Atlantafan - 06-27-2006 02:59 PM

Just out of couriosity, what was the strongest hurricane to make landfall?


What was the strongest landfalling hurricane? - Stormlover - 06-27-2006 03:03 PM

Atlantafan Wrote:Just out of couriosity, what was the strongest hurricane to make landfall?
The strongest landfalling hurricane was the Labor Day Hurricane of 1935 (892 mbar).
Also FYI:

The most intense hurricane on record to form in the North Atlantic basin was Hurricane Wilma (2005) (882 mbar).
The longest-lasting hurricane was 1899 Hurricane San Ciriaco (28 days).
The fastest-moving hurricane was the New England Hurricane of 1938 at 70 mph.
The most tornadoes spawned by a hurricane was 123 by Hurricane Frances (2004 season).
The deadliest hurricane was the Great Hurricane of 1780 (22,000 fatalities).
The most damaging hurricane (adjusted for inflation) was Hurricane Katrina of the 2005 season which caused $75 billion in damages (2005 USD).


What was the strongest landfalling hurricane? - Atlantafan - 06-27-2006 03:09 PM

Thanks


What was the strongest landfalling hurricane? - buddy - 06-28-2006 01:32 PM

@storm: Where did you get those stats from?/huh


What was the strongest landfalling hurricane? - Stormlover - 06-28-2006 01:41 PM

buddy Wrote:@storm: Where did you get those stats from?/huh
http://www.wikipedia.com


What was the strongest landfalling hurricane? - Matrix13 - 07-06-2006 05:08 PM

http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/tcfaq/tcfaqHED.html

E14 covers the answer to this question for the US.


What was the strongest landfalling hurricane? - mike18xx - 08-30-2006 12:08 AM

Stormlover Wrote:The most damaging hurricane (adjusted for inflation) was Hurricane Katrina of the 2005 season which caused $75 billion in damages (2005 USD).
Doubtful, unless you're ignoring the Great Hurricane of 1780, which, besides killing the 22,000 people indicated, completely razed nearly every building (including strongly-built military forts) on several islands of the Lesser Antilles, and sunk nearly 100 warships belonging to the French and English navies (half of the dead were soldiers who drowned as their ships foundered). The Great Hurricane was so powerful that it debarked trees (something no modern cat-5 hurricane has been recorded to do).

90% of Katrina's "damage" wasn't really caused by the hurricane per se, but by broken-levee flooding due to the incompetence of government agencies in New Orleans, and attendant insurance estimates.

The Great Hurricane of 1780 didn't leave many of its victims alive to file insurance claims...if any had insurance in that era.