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Question for those who live in Tornado prone area's?
02-06-2008, 03:55 PM
Post: #1
Question for those who live in Tornado prone area's?
I heard on the news that 50 people dies yesterday in tornado's around Illinois, Tennessee, Indiana. Most in Western Tennessee. Don't they have early warning sirens that blast when tornado's are spotted. How come so many deathes? Don't people have storm shelter's who live in prone areas? I know I would. I heard that Union University in Tennessee was hit. No one killed but over 50 injured. Cars overturned, walls ripped off. You'd think a college would be more responsible for where the sturdents were and protecting them.

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02-06-2008, 04:08 PM
Post: #2
Question for those who live in Tornado prone area's?
Thought provoking question that I've been asking for 25 years!!! I live in Texas, in Tornado Alley. Early warning? That would be nice - sometimes these things form right on top of you, little advance notice. As far as shelters - HA!! Too expensive to build (ground shifts too much, water table too high, THEY say, ME thinks laziness) - think it ought to be MANDATORY to have underground shelters available, especially in the Alley. Hate this time of year - which seems to be getting earlier and lasting longer, hitting in unexpected places, unexpected times - high RISK in FEBRUARY??????????

*Storm* Sad

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02-06-2008, 04:33 PM
Post: #3
Question for those who live in Tornado prone area's?
Quote by Stormspinner:Hate this time of year - which seems to be getting earlier and lasting longer, hitting in unexpected places, unexpected times - high RISK in FEBRUARY??????????

Yes! I've heard theories on why their more frequent now and coming earlier. It's got to do with El Nina and EL Nino. Warm air ramming into a cold front causing severe weather. A man on Weather.com had a theory that the salinity of the ocean water's was the culprit in the drastic changes in the weather. A little over my head tho. But if you look at the weather map when this violent weather happens. It's always the clash of warm and cold front's. Winter's have more fluctuations in weather temps now. In Washington D.C. today it was suppose to hit 80.

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02-06-2008, 10:28 PM
Post: #4
Question for those who live in Tornado prone area's?
StormSpinner Wrote:As far as shelters - HA!! Too expensive to build (ground shifts too much, water table too high, THEY say, ME thinks laziness)

*Storm* Sad
There is a lot of money to be made in that business so I doubt laziness is a factor. They would build them if they could, same with basements in Oklahoma.

Winter outbreaks may be rare but I highly doubt it has anything to do with any global warming or whatever the media wants to say.

Quote:Winter tornado outbreaks comprise 99% of all major outbreaks since 1950. In four out of five cases, they are accompanied by widespread blizzard, heavy snow conditions, and/or extensive glazing on the cold side of the responsible weather system. Two mean storm tracks for these outbreaks have been established but one predominates. This track has its origin over the southern plains states and moves northeastward to the upper Great Lakes region. Owing to the location of its origin, it is associated with a stronger baroclinic zone than the typical winter storm of the Plains states, since the 500 mb trough is typically farther south and the southerly low-level (850 mb) air flow out of the Gulf of Mexico is significantly more moist. A comparable number of heavy snow/ice storm occurrences without major tornado outbreaks was investigated and it appears that the intensity of the baroclinic zone and the location of the low-level features with respect to the Gulf moisture are the determining factors in differentiating between outbreak and non-outbreak situations. While the intensity of winter outbreak tornadoes is comparable to spring outbreak tornadoes, long-track winter outbreak tornadoes account for a greater percentage of deaths than the long-track spring outbreak tornadoes.
From here http://ams.allenpress.com/archive/1520-0...5-1072.pdf and this was from 1981!

As far as early warning the NWS does a damn good job doing what they do. Sometimes storms develop rapidly before they can get a warning out.

The deaths were most likely from a few things. Some of the tornadoes occurred after dark, people have the mentality that it can't happen to them, the storms were racing at >50mph. They had plenty of warning to the situation from almost 5 days out, the watches were PDS watches and issued hours before any storms fired. Once the storms fired the NWS had lead times of up to 25 minutes on the storms. Sirens were blaring TV stations were wall to wall. I was watching online. People just need to learn to take care of themselves and be aware. A 911 tape from the Wis. tornado last month had people calling and asking why the sirens were going off. It was January but if you hear the sirens turn on the freakin TV or radio and take action!

The college has been hit before and had a plan in place hence the injuries but no fatalities, they knew what to do.

This no warning stuff really hits a nerve when you see people on CNN and the news anchors bringing it up every 5 minutes about if there was plenty of warning. There was! people need to take some responsibility for themselves and be aware. There is TV the Internet, radio, weather radios... All kinds of ways to be warned.

BTW I live in the alley and have a plan. I made it through the May 8th 2003 Moore event unharmed mostly because I had a plan that was in place way before that ever happened. We have to take care of and look out for ourselves in times of disaster no matter what time of year. Have a plan! I can't stress that enough!

David
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02-06-2008, 11:01 PM
Post: #5
Question for those who live in Tornado prone area's?
I understand everything you have said, David, and I do feel that the media does everything in it's power to warn people of impending severe weather and disasters in the making. With hurricanes, floods (unless a dam breaks, of course) and volcanos, people really should never be caught off guard. There is usually ample warning to take action to protect yourself.
But tornados are different. Especially in the south...basements are very rare down here, or storm shelters of any kind, for that matter. Even when folks heed the warning, they're often caught with literally no safe place in which to take shelter. For example: The only "plan" I can come up with in my house is a coat closet in the middle of the hallway. My house is surrounded by tall pine trees, it is a one story house, and if I have 5 minutes to react, that is the only "safe" place I can think of. It is very unnerving, to say the least. I lived in Oklahoma and Kansas and in Illinois as a child, and we always had a basement.
I don't know what the answer is....it is ironic that yesterday, driving to Mississippi and seeing the black clouds & hearing the weather predictions, my thoughts & instincts were to get off of the highway & possibly seek shelter in a shopping mall. Then, when I got home last night, I heard about the mall in Memphis collapsing.
My prayers and sympathy goes out to all of the victims of yesterday's storms, and I am thankful that we live in an age where the media can get the word out as fast as they do.
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02-06-2008, 11:09 PM
Post: #6
Question for those who live in Tornado prone area's?
You may not have the best option for shelter (that is about all I have too.) and yes it is unnerving but you have a plan so when you only have 5 minutes or less to react you already know where to go. Smile And you had a plan when you were on the road, although I would only pick a mall or any big shopping type center as a last resort. I would probably pick a smaller convince store and head to the bathroom area away from all the glass.

David
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02-07-2008, 07:32 PM
Post: #7
Question for those who live in Tornado prone area's?
i heard because so many people lost there lives was because the storms were going 60-65 mph that didnt give anyone anytime to hit the basment, the question is how long was it that the sirens went off till the tornado hit?

Forrest Lambert
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02-07-2008, 09:13 PM
Post: #8
Question for those who live in Tornado prone area's?
I don't know how many storms had a good lead time but I know some had 20 minutes plus. I am pretty sure that the quick storm motions played a role in the loss of life that we had.

What gets me going is when people mainly the news keep pressing the issue if the warnings went out in time and bringing it up every 5 minutes. This is coming from news anchors that don't even know the difference between a wall cloud and a tornado. It seems like every outbreak there is an agenda to make it appear that there was little or no warning which wasn't the case. People see this on the news and automatically blame the lack of warning when that is far from the truth.

David
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02-07-2008, 09:17 PM
Post: #9
Question for those who live in Tornado prone area's?
i know they need to stop that, they need training or somthing

Forrest Lambert
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02-08-2008, 02:51 PM
Post: #10
Question for those who live in Tornado prone area's?
I live in an apartment (government housing), only shelter I have is a teeny tiny claustrophobic half bath (bathtub, upstairs). No room for twin sis, me and mattress. Last week, we had 33 mph winds, gusts to 55, the walls were literally making cracking noises. That's scary - if the walls do that at 55, you know good and well they're not going to sustain the winds of a tornado! Really makes me nervous now. Been in five tornadoes, lost my roof in the third - as I said before, if I could afford to move, I WOULD! Hate svr ...

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