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Hurricane Rita old thread
09-23-2005, 02:52 AM
Post: #1051
Hurricane Rita old thread
Will my family still be able to leave around 9-10 pm? WE're in LAfayette....They're still thinking its going to make that west move and go to gal.
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09-23-2005, 03:32 AM
Post: #1052
Hurricane Rita old thread
Could this be TD19 in 144HRS?

Retired from ASA now for some real flying
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09-23-2005, 04:07 AM
Post: #1053
Hurricane Rita old thread
Here are the latest positions cone error and strike probabilities as of 4:00AM CST by the NHC

Retired from ASA now for some real flying
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09-23-2005, 06:05 AM
Post: #1054
Hurricane Rita old thread
Morning - I wish I could say good.....Looks like she is moving along pretty good now.

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09-23-2005, 06:46 AM
Post: #1055
Hurricane Rita old thread
Well I will say it, good morning yall. You know, Texas, Arkansas, and Louisiana were experiencing a drought, well I think people were praying way too hard for rain, lol.

Rebecca
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09-23-2005, 07:03 AM
Post: #1056
Hurricane Rita old thread
I'm assuming now that i dont have to worry bout no annular eye and no cat 5 coming my way?
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09-23-2005, 07:10 AM
Post: #1057
Hurricane Rita old thread
http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/PS/TROP/DATA/RT/...-loop.html

could this be the good news (relatively speaking) we've been hoping for? looks like the eye is getting squashed and she's definitely NOT ramping up, das fo sho
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09-23-2005, 07:18 AM
Post: #1058
Hurricane Rita old thread
Anything can happen before landfall....These things have a mind of its own.....Who knows......Rita could turn around and hit Japan....
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09-23-2005, 07:33 AM
Post: #1059
Hurricane Rita old thread
Hurricane Rita Intermediate Advisory Number 23a


Statement as of 7:00 am CDT on September 23, 2005



...Extremely dangerous category four Hurricane Rita continues toward
the southwest Louisiana and Upper Texas coasts...

a Hurricane Warning is in effect from Port O'Connor Texas to Morgan
City Louisiana. A Hurricane Warning means that hurricane conditions
are expected within the warning area within the next 24 hours.
Preparations to protect life and property should be rushed to
completion.

A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for the southeastern coast of
Louisiana east of Morgan City to the mouth of the Pearl River
including metropolitan New Orleans and Lake Pontchartrain...and
from south of Port O'Connor to Port Mansfield Texas. A Tropical
Storm Warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected
within the warning area within the next 24 hours. Some portions of
the Tropical Storm Warning in Texas could be discontinued later
today.

For storm information specific to your area...including possible
inland watches and warnings...please monitor products issued
by your local weather office.

At 7 am CDT...1200z...the center of Hurricane Rita was located near
latitude 27.1 north...longitude 91.5 west or about 260 miles
southeast of Galveston Texas and about 220 miles south-southeast of
Cameron Louisiana.

Rita is moving toward the northwest near 9 mph...and this general
motion is expected to continue for the next 24 hours. On this
track...the core of Rita will be approaching the southwest
Louisiana and Upper Texas coasts late today or tonight.

Maximum sustained winds are near 140 mph...with higher gusts. Rita
is an extremely dangerous category four hurricane on the
Saffir-Simpson scale. Some fluctuations in strength are expected
during the next 24 hours.

Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 85 miles from the
center...and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 205
miles.

The minimum central pressure just estimated from Air Force Reserve
hurricane hunter aircraft data was 930 mb...27.46 inches.

Coastal storm surge flooding of 15 to 20 feet above normal tide
levels...along with large and dangerous battering waves...can be
expected near and to the east of where the center makes landfall.
Tides are currently running about 2 feet above normal along the
Louisiana...Mississippi and Alabama coasts in the areas affected by
Katrina. Tides in those areas will increase to 3 to 5 feet and be
accompanied by large waves...and residents there could experience
coastal flooding. Large swells generated by Rita will likely affect
most portions of the Gulf Coast.

Rita is expected to produce rainfall accumulations of 8 to 12
inches...with isolated maximum amounts of 15 inches over
southeastern Texas and southwestern Louisiana as it moves inland.
Since Rita is forecast to slow down significantly after making
landfall...total accumulations in excess of 25 inches are possible
over the next several days across eastern Texas and western
Louisiana. In addition...rainfall amounts of 3 to 5 inches are
possible over southeastern Louisiana including metropolitan New
Orleans.

Isolated tornadoes are possible today over portions of southeastern
Texas and southern Louisiana.

Repeating the 7 am CDT position...27.1 N... 91.5 W. Movement
toward...northwest near 10 mph. Maximum sustained winds...140 mph.
Minimum central pressure... 930 mb.

The next advisory will be issued by the National Hurricane Center at
10 am CDT.

Forecaster Avila

$$

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09-23-2005, 07:35 AM
Post: #1060
Hurricane Rita old thread
itz5o4tony Wrote:Anything can happen before landfall....These things have a mind of its own.....Who knows......Rita could turn around and hit Japan....

More chance of me winning the UK lottery this weekend than the Tokyo landfall.
---
Good morning all.
yes, the eye looks very messy, there is a fair bit of dry air in the west...but Rita has a lot of resources to call upon to fight her way north-westwards, and still cause utter havoc.

*watching the cars stuck on the freeways is disturbing. The clock is ticking...time is fast running out. I do hope they get those roads clear within the next 6 hours, after that, the tropical storm force winds start to flirt with the coastal areas I believe.

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