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job as a meteorologist
06-22-2006, 03:17 PM
Post: #1
job as a meteorologist
Hiya.
I'm only 17 but I'm thinking about working as a meteorologist after college/university.
I'm going to move to the States from Germany in about 2 years.

Can you study meteorology in the U.S. or do you need to take different subjects that create your background knowledge as a meteorologist, for instance physics, chemistry etc. ?
If you can study meteorology, does somebody know how difficult it is?
Are meteorologists needed at all or are there too many of them?
What qualifications do I need as a meteorologist?
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06-22-2006, 03:19 PM
Post: #2
job as a meteorologist
buddy Wrote:Hiya.
I'm only 17 but I'm thinking about working as a meteorologist after college/university.
I'm going to move to the States from Germany in about 2 years.

Can you study meteorology in the U.S. or do you need to take different subjects that create your background knowledge as a meteorologist, for instance physics, chemistry etc. ?
If you can study meteorology, does somebody know how difficult it is?
Are meteorologists needed at all or are there too many of them?
Heres a place to look for colleges that teach it:
http://www.a2zcolleges.com/Majors/Atmosp...ences.html
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06-22-2006, 03:22 PM
Post: #3
job as a meteorologist
Oh, cool thanks.
Do you need to major in that field if you want to become a meteorologist? Or does it simply give you a much better chance to be accepted for a position?
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06-22-2006, 04:26 PM
Post: #4
job as a meteorologist
Learn all you can about how the Atlantic Ocean can alter the weather. If you can master that, you'll have no problem forecasting in the U.S.

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06-22-2006, 04:28 PM
Post: #5
job as a meteorologist
Hey buddy... Im currently a meteorology student at the University of Oklahoma, maybe I can help you out a little.

Quote:Can you study meteorology in the U.S. or do you need to take different subjects that create your background knowledge as a meteorologist, for instance physics, chemistry etc. ?

It depends on the college. At the University of Oklahoma for example, you can start right off with meteorology as your major. Of course, you take some physics/chem/calc backround classes, but you should have true meteorology classes already by your second year. However, some schools only offer graduate programs in meteorology. If you are seriously considering meteorology, its best to start off directly with this major. Once you get to grad school, you wont have to play catch up like someone who majored in physics or math. However, if you aren't to sure yet about meteorology, you can always major in physics, math, chem, oceanography, ect. to have to the backround but not be locked into a specific career path.

Check with the colleges stormlover listed. You can find which have meteorology as a major or just meteorology as a grad program.


Quote:If you can study meteorology, does somebody know how difficult it is?

It really depends on how you are with science and math. Meteorology obviously requires a hefty backround in physics and calculus, in fact for example, at OU, you take 2 physics and 5 calculus classes before you get heavily into meteorology classes. If you have the interest, and are good at math and science... its really what you put into it. A lot of people drop meteorology as a major, but these are mainly the "Twister" types who really dont know what they are getting into. You have to know that it does require heavy calculus and physics, as I mentioned, but if you are skilled, prepared, and have the motivation, it is obviously acheivable.

Quote:Are meteorologists needed at all or are there too many of them?

Actually, from what I read before I started college, there is a nice turnover/acceptance rate with meteorology. That means that as many people as there are jobs for, the same amount of people are looking for those jobs. It is not hard to get a job as a meteorologist. However, there are a lot of different jobs to take... from the private industry, helping buisinesses, to Government. Depending on what you want to do, you may have a harder time finding a specific career you want to pursue.




Quote:What qualifications do I need as a meteorologist?

It depends on the career you are looking for. You at least need a Bachelors degree in meteorology to get nearly every job. Masters degrees and doctorates are prefered more and will make you more competitive. Other than a great education from a great school, there are no other qualifications other than a love for weather!

" There is only one duty, only one safe course, and that is to try to be right and not fear to do or say what you believe." - Winston Churchill

"In the history of the world, the true test of a civilization is how well people treat the most vulnerable and most helpless in their society. The sponsors and supporters of this bill believe that abortion is wrong because unborn children are the most vulnerable and most helpless persons in our society. I agree with them." - Mike Rounds, Governor of South Dakota
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06-22-2006, 04:56 PM
Post: #6
job as a meteorologist
Great, thanks for your help soonermeteor!

I've just quit taking physics in school, I don't think the stuff that's due in physics will help me a lot. If I'm wrong I can still change it before it's too late...
What areas of physics need to be covered in order to be prepared for physics in college or can I catch up anyhow?
I'm good at math, calculus is on next year, so I'll take that into consideration then, but I don't think it will be a big problem.
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06-22-2006, 06:48 PM
Post: #7
job as a meteorologist
Well, unfortunately, even though you never need to know everything, schools don't create general classes that cater to specific majors. The only difference Ive seen is physics for life science and physics for engineers here at OU. You'll probably need a couple general classes for the meteorology major, covering kinematics, electricity and magnetism, sound, water, and energy. You don't have to take physics in high school though. These are beginner physics classes in college unless you test out of them. Its always great to have a backround becuase it will make college classes easier, but it is not required.

" There is only one duty, only one safe course, and that is to try to be right and not fear to do or say what you believe." - Winston Churchill

"In the history of the world, the true test of a civilization is how well people treat the most vulnerable and most helpless in their society. The sponsors and supporters of this bill believe that abortion is wrong because unborn children are the most vulnerable and most helpless persons in our society. I agree with them." - Mike Rounds, Governor of South Dakota
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06-24-2006, 05:40 AM
Post: #8
job as a meteorologist
Thanks a lot, you helped me a ton!/clap1
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